India’s economy contracted at its steepest pace of 23.9% in the June quarter as the pandemic lockdown dented consumer and business spending, putting pressure on the government and central bank for further stimulus and a rate cut.

The gross domestic product (GDP) data released on Monday showed consumer spending, private investments and exports all collapsed during the world’s strictest lockdown imposed in late March to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.

A Reuters poll of economists had forecast that GDP in the world’s fifth-largest economy will contract by 18.3% in the June quarter, compared with 3.1% growth in the previous quarter, the worst performance in at least eight years.

PRITHVIRAJ SRINIVAS, CHIEF ECONOMIST, AXIS CAPITAL, MUMBAI

“The June-quarter GDP growth number confirms that India’s national lockdown was the most severe and the deepest GDP decline among large countries.

“The gradual reversal of the lockdown since mid-April is likely to reduce the severity of GDP contraction in coming quarters. However, to erase the contraction fully we need to see an improved consumer sentiment.” SHASHANK MENDIRATTA, ECONOMIST, IBM, NEW DELHI

“As expected, growth contracted sharply in the June quarter. Investment demand recorded a 47% decline, while private consumption recorded a contraction of nearly 20%. With a contraction of 20.6% y/y, service sector was a key drag on the growth.

“While the overall growth print witnessed the weakest decline on record, this also marks a bottom in our view. Our assessment is that investment will likely stay weak, while consumption activity is likely to improve in subsequent quarters. For a broader recovery, however, supportive policy will need to provide a push.”

ADITI NAYAR, PRINCIPAL ECONOMIST, ICRA, GURUGRAM

“The GDP and GVA plunged precipitously in the lockdown-ridden Q1 of FY2021, both printing similar to our forecast of a 25% contraction. Moreover, incoming data on the MSME and less-formal sectors could manifest in a deeper contraction when revised data is released subsequently. We maintain our forecast that the Indian economy will contract by 9.5% in FY2021.

“The wide discrepancy between the double-digit growth of the government’s final consumption expenditure and the contraction in public administration, defence and other services on the production side, is rather incongruous.”

SUVODEEP RAKSHIT, SENIOR ECONOMIST, KOTAK INSTITUTIONAL EQUITIES, MUMBAI

“Real GDP growth at (-)23.9% in 1QFY21 was much lower than what the markets were expecting. The choice for the government will be on whether the consumption or the investment side needs to be pushed. Given the limited fiscal space and the need to stimulate a more durable growth, the growth recovery will be gradual and is likely to continue into 1HFY22.”

SACHIN K SHEORAN, CEO, HBF DIRECT LIMITED INDIA

I accept recovery in India's financial development will be more slow than prior desires after the nation's GDP shrunk by a higher-than-anticipated 23.9 percent in the June quarter–the most noticeably awful in over 40 years.

I had anticipated that total national output on the planet's fifth-biggest economy will decrease by 18.3 percent in the June quarter, contrasted with 3.1 percent development in the past quarter; the most exceedingly terrible presentation in any event eight years.

MADHAVI ARORA, LEAD ECONOMIST, FX AND RATES, EDELWEISS SECURITIES, MUMBAI

“The Q1 GDP growth print came in worse than our expectations of -18%. The surprise take-away elements were the better-than-expected performance of finance and real-estate sectors, and more pertinently, a sharp contraction in public administration (proxy for government spending) data. Nonetheless, it does little to change the broad contours of the growth trajectory.

“The sub-optimal policy response would only mean the downward cycle could stretch further, while structural constraints limit sustained secular growth pick-up ahead. We think the government will have to loosen its fiscal strings further in 2HFY21 if growth prospects remain weak.”

SAKSHI GUPTA, SENIOR ECONOMIST, HDFC BANK, GURUGRAM

“Given the lack of reporting due to the lockdown in Q1 (especially for the informal sector), we expect the GDP numbers to be revised down further in subsequent releases.

“Hopes of an economic recovery in the second half of the year have been pinned on a rural sector revival. However, with the virus spreading to the hinterland, the rural support might be lower than expected.

“In terms of the growth prints, Q1 is likely to be the worst print and it will be a very slow grind up from this bottom going forward. We continue to expect a -7.5% growth print for the year with a downward bias to our forecast.”

SIDDHARTHA SANYAL, CHIEF ECONOMIST AND HEAD OF RESEARCH, BANDHAN BANK, KOLKATA

“The GDP contraction of nearly 24% y/y during Q1 FY21 was clearly sharper than expected. Also, given the lack of clarity about whether the disruption in informal sector activities were captured adequately, the possibility of further worsening of Q1 FY21 GDP estimate during subsequent rounds of revisions cannot be ruled out. Overall, GDP looks set to record near double-digit contraction during FY21.

“However, rural activities seem to be relatively more resilient at the moment and might benefit from the government’s rural-focused employment schemes. Given the recent uptick in CPI prints, it seems that the RBI may not be in a position to cut rates in the near-future.”

UPASNA BHARDWAJ, SENIOR ECONOMIST, KOTAK MAHINDRA BANK, MUMBAI

“After a record contraction in Q1, we expect the following quarters to normalise registering a much slower fall. The high-frequency data since June has been suggesting a significant pickup in activity. Nonetheless, the weakness in demand is expected to weigh across all sectors and some policy support will be necessary to cushion any further deterioration.

“We expect some kind of stimulus from the government in the coming few months. The recent policy measures from the RBI will help cap any sharp upside risks to bond yields in case of any incremental supply.”

RUPA REGE NITSURE, GROUP CHIEF ECONOMIST, L&T FINANCIAL HOLDINGS, MUMBAI

“Contraction of real GDP at 23.9% appears to be underestimated, as data collection efforts were hit by the pandemic.

“The NSO had to use substitutes and proxies to estimate the losses of informal sector. So there is a very high probability that this data will undergo several revisions in the future. But broader trends are clearly visible.

“Unless the central and state governments focus on re-starting the economic machine completely, the real process of repair and reconstruction will not gain momentum. Unless this is given the top-most priority, India will get trapped with the unsustainable debt burden.”

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